Salesforce Pros: If you haven’t been getting out much…

You might have noticed the number of free/discounted online courses that are being made available.

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The latest is Pluralsight offering the month of April for free (no credit card required or other subscription shenanigans).

Over 7000 courses, a few hundred on Salesforce.

I’ve seen posts in the past regarding the lack of training available around CPQ. Pluralsight has 2 that I came across: Demystifying CPQ and CPQ for beginners.

Bonus tip: After taking a class, shoot a personal LI invite to the author. A great way to build a new connection for the future.

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Salesforce Pros & Newcomers: Opinion on the current job market

While my (list) view of the current Salesforce job market is relatively small, a few thoughts to share:

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Due to the uncertainty, it seems most companies are putting their hiring on hold. The good thing for those that aren’t, is the greater pool of available talent to choose from.

If you’re a Salesforce newcomer, this is an ideal time to ask your connections if there is an opportunity to pick up some volunteer work, particularly if you hear about layoffs happening. Those on the ground are probably overwhelmed with the workload which gives you a chance to get some experience on the lower level tasks they don’t have time for (data analysis, data cleanup, prototyping, etc.). CRM related functions are still happening.

If you’re currently one of those that have more work than hours and have the capacity to offload some of the smaller, maybe mundane, tasks that you think a newcomer could help out with, please do so.

For those that are in caught in the cross-fire, I’m sure you know about the importance of continuing to up-skill.

What better time to dive into understanding how those Apex Triggers work and why Developer Donnie seemed to get all the credit when it comes to building complex Salesforce solutions.

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Slowing down…

Maybe things have slowed down a little for you during this time and you’re not constantly running from one meeting, one call, one hallway conversation, one text, one email, one Slack chat, one Chatter feed to the next all day long.

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How about a little career discovery/self-reflection time?

Science says a little bit of discovery, followed by a lot of development, then a lifetime of deepening will keep you on the right track.

For Discovery, asking yourself:

1. What do I like to think about?

2. Where does my mind wander?

3. What do I really care about?

4. What matters most to me?

5. How do I enjoy spending time?

6. In contrast, what do I find unbearable?

Also some definitions on what you might be looking for:

A job: “I view my job as just a necessity of life”

A career: “I view my job primarily as a stepping stone to other jobs”

A calling: “My work is one of the most important things in my life”

Reference: Grit by Angela Duckworth

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Over the weekend, I caught “Uncle” Bob Martin’s presentation on The Future of Programming.

Within it, he speaks about the history and evolution of hardware, software, languages, methodologies and programmers, while stressing the importance for technical discipline.

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Back in 1945, it was predicted that the need for programmers was going to continue to be in high demand (considered mathematicians back then).

You might want to check out his presentation on YouTube as you’ll probably learn something new and it’s pretty entertaining (assuming you’re a techie).

Key takeaway (among many): as the amount of new programmers doubles every 5 years, this results in half the total number of programmers to not have experience, causing a perpetual cycle of inexperience, then causing the same programming mistakes to be made over and over, if the learnings of the previous are not taught to the new.

Below are some of the slides from his presentation.

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Salesforce Professionals – are you gritty?

Do you want to be grittier?

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What defines grit?

Based on Angela Duckworth’s book, Grit, her research shows 4 characteristics:

1. Interest – when we’re captivated by the endeavor as a whole, although some of it sucks, overall we find it interesting

2. Practice – the need to continuously be better and resist complacency

3. Purpose – your work is important not just to you but others, interest without purpose is not sustainable

4. Hope – ability to keep going, knowing there’s a light at the end of the tunnel, when things get difficult

If your current situation has you down, maybe check out this book to help bring out the grit within you.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Expecting versus Accepting

Before an interview, are you expecting an outcome to be favorable or rather accepting the decision no matter what?

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There are so many variables at play when it comes to interviews and the outcome is unpredictable, would accepting before starting be easier on your emotional well being?

Particularity, because you’re not the one making the decision and although you might have felt it went well, those on the receiving end might have felt otherwise, or maybe they decided to put the position on hold, or received an internal referral, or promoted within.

All areas out of your direct control.

You did your best at the time, and even if you didn’t, the conversation has ended.

When we expect a specific outcome, if we don’t get it, we’re usually disappointment.

Being disappointed in someone else’s action or decision can be a monkey on our back that we don’t want or need.

I’m not suggesting for you to agree with the outcome, but by accepting it allows you to take ownership, understand, embrace and take what you can from the situation as it unfolds.

When it comes to interviews, plan for victory, and learn from defeat.

Then if you succeed, celebrate and if you fail, re-calibrate.

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Salesforce 1st Time Career Seekers: Impossible

Is landing your 1st Salesforce position considered impossible?

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Impossible is an intriguing word meaning incapable of being true.

While there are some things that are considered impossible (e.g. changing the past), I don’t think landing your 1st Salesforce position can be one of them.

Maybe: Difficult, hard, frustrating, aggravating, challenging, annoying, disappointing and plenty of other verbs/adverbs.

But impossible?

Or asked another way, how can you prove it’s really impossible, can’t there always be one more attempt to make something possible?

Same concept can be applied to almost everything that we do…

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Salesforce Newcomers: How are you standing out among your peers?

In addition to showcasing some of your work, how about publishing a few articles or videos and then have them as part of your extracurriculars on your resume.

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Here’s some ideas:

  • A weekly set of questions/problems and answers that were posted on https://lnkd.in/eSAxn9E and why you thought they were important..
  • The top 3 Salesforce bloggers you enjoy reading about and what were some key takeaways they’ve shared.
  • Some of the recent Salesforce acquisitions, the facts about them, why Salesforce thought they were a good purchase and how that can change the CRM landscape.
  • A review of the seasonal release notes and which will make the biggest impact to Sales, Marketing, Admins, Devs, etc.
  • The top 5 trailheads that you found the most useful to a Salesforce newcomer and why.
  • A review on some of the AppExchange apps that you’ve installed and your assessment of those on why those are helpful.

A good quote to think about:
“In a crowded marketplace, fitting in is a failure. In a busy marketplace, not standing out is the same as being invisible” ~ Seth Godin (Marketer and Author)

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Salesforce Career Newcomers: Below are some thoughts and important questions I believe are important to ask yourself (or to ask someone else for help), if you’re considering down a new career in Salesforce.

1. Do I need an advantage(s) when compared to others to have success? If so, what are they? Talent, effort, education, background, personality, connections, all, none.

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2. How likely am I to succeed? Why do I feel that way?

3. How significant is the payoff?

4. Is there an opportunity cost? Could/Should I be doing something else with my time? If so, what?

5. Do I have the right support system and encouragement to succeed? Are they actually helping or just blowing smoke?

6. Will I learn something about myself if I fail? Can I apply those lessons elsewhere?

7. When should I decide on a different path? Do I/Should I put a hard date in place? Am I starting to feel the financial pinch?

8. Will I be happy if I succeed? If so, why?

9. Am I utilizing my time as effectively as I should towards this path? If not, what else should I be doing instead?

10. Do I feel any momentum whatsoever or am I just consistently treading water?

These are not intended to discourage, but they are meant to be real, to try and help ensure you understand the landscape and personal well-being.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: How do you receive constructive feedback?

Does it bruise your ego?

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Does it imply you were wrong and they were right?

Does it make you upset or distraught?

If so, maybe you can think about it differently…

It’s a GIFT.

To provide you better direction.

To give you more guidance.

To show you what’s needed to succeed.

To help you understand what’s important.

And it’s up to you to decide how to take it and make adjustments.

Rather than being upset, thank them that they took the time and energy to provide feedback as they’re helping, guiding and actually caring to make you better.

While this is an unnatural feeling, by taking a sense of gratitude to the individual or group providing you the message can be a game-changer in how you deal with constructive feedback, flopped interviews, discrepancies of opinion, etc.

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Chris, where should I go next?

To a big or small consulting company.

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The last few weeks I was asked for my point of view on going to a smaller versus a larger Salesforce consulting company as they were getting offers from both.

While I have my own personal biases based on the previous decisions I’ve made and where it led me, and there is no one right answer, as it really depends on where you are in your career and what you’re looking for.

But, if you’re indifferent, my suggestion: Go Big.

Often, the biggest players get the gnarliest implementations/transformations, have the toughest customers to satisfy, have more politics at play, work the longest hours, have more administrative overhead, and can cause more stress.

“That’s dumb Chris, why would I want to put myself through that?”

Answer: Exposure.

If you’re in the earlier stages of your career, being exposed to as much as you can early on, helps in determining what you want or don’t want for your future.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: “If I had only”

How many times have we said or thought this?

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After the interview…

If I had only:

– Gotten up earlier

– Left on time

– Prepared better

– Wrote it down

– Understood how

– Researched more

– Shook hands firmly

– Answered more thoroughly

– Shown more confidence

– Showered

– Remembered their name(s)

– Not gotten so flustered

– Tripped over my words

– Sat up straighter

– Talked with my mouth full

– Said “I don’t know” instead of BS’ing

– Ironed my suit

– Interrupted

– Looked them in the eye

– Spit out my gum

– Shown my work

– Asked more intelligent questions

– Thanked them

Well, we didn’t, we tried, we forgot, we got distracted, we came up short.

It’s over: 

– Reflect briefly

– Go for a walk 

– Eat a cheeseburger

– Watch a Seinfeld rerun

– Have “A” cocktail

– Talk to someone

– Write it down 

– Get it out 

You’re fortunate to have tomorrow, and the opportunity to go at it again.

“Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose” (Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th POTUS)

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The Salesforce Career Paradox (which can probably apply to most fields):

Entry Level Job Seekers: no choices (struggle to get their 1st position).

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Mid Level Job Seekers: too many choices (struggle to be able to decide which position to take next).

Senior Level Job Seekers: the right choice (struggle to find a position that can actually propel their career to the next level).

And while one category may seem like a “better” problem to have, as you’re not in it, each one has it’s own respective challenges that we go through.

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Effective Communication…

Describe an example of a process that you’ve built as a Salesforce Administrator:

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“Using an agile methodology, I’ve put together an in-depth and ultra-sophisticated series of highly regulated and error-free automation process steps that entails initiating and utilizing multiple decision criteria to produce an abundance of desired outcomes for the company’s sales team.”

Say what?!

There’s an art and genius to using simple language to get a message across.

By delivering precise answers that are clear and comprehensive to interview questions, you can be 2 (process builder) steps above the rest.

Rather, how about something like:

“I created a process that had 3 immediate actions, which included creating a new contract record, a post to a defined Sales Team chatter group, an email to the VP of Sales, as well 2 scheduled follow up tasks of 7 and 14 days, once an opportunity amount above $100,000 hit the stage of closed/won.”

I’m sure this could even use some refinement, but hopefully the point is apparent.

Practice your Q&A with yourself (or with your mom, your dog or favorite stuffed animal).

“Good communication is the bridge between confusion and clarity” (Nat Turner, Minister, Rebellion leader that led to the Civil War and slavery abolishment)

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Long term benefits of working for a consulting company.

You’re probably not always at a point to be too selective in all your career choices, but if you have a chance to work for a major, established, well-known consulting company and understand some of the nuances that come with it:

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travel, extra hours, difficult clients, metrics, driven management, egos, continuously being pushed out of your comfort zone, asked to take on more work, small fish in a big pond environment, etc. and can grind it out for a few years, please do.

As I meet with companies (industry and consulting), they often ask for this background for their next hire, as they were once there and can relate: “Oh, you worked at X, me too, let’s chat”.

It has benefited me in my career, although it often sucked at the time, being on conference calls on a Friday night or prepping for a go-live over a holiday break, it’s opened up future conversations and opportunities that I might not otherwise would have had.

It’s not for everyone, but might be something you’d like to think about trying as you continue down your career path.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Transferable Systems Skills

A good story on being smarter than the recruiting systems.

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Often applicant tracking systems spit out resumes without specific keywords being recognized and while I’m not suggesting to lie on a resume, I do suggest to take what’s available and apply it.

Over the past few weeks, Bhavana Patel, CSM and I were discussing how she could take her other non-Salesforce experiences and skills and relate it to what a Salesforce Admin’s responsibilities would be.

Intelligently, she took the relatable keywords and phrases from the below admin training description and ensured her resume accounted for those that were applicable based on other systems she has worked on:

https://trailhead.salesforce.com/en/academy/classes/adm201-administration-essentials-for-new-admins/

Keywords such as: Data, Formulas, Reports, Records, Logins, Access, Permissions, Configure, User Interface, Troubleshoot, Exceptions, Collaboration, Automation, etc.

I think it was a valuable exercise and if you’re not getting the results that you’re looking for, you may want to cross reference your resume.

“Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are.” Theodore Roosevelt, 26th POTUS

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“If you want to be a knight, act like a knight”

While the classic novel by Miguel de Cervantes of Don Quixote has many twists and turns, one theme is clear, that I think can apply to your goal of moving into or up in your Salesforce career as an Admin/Dev/Architect/Manager, etc.

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If you want to be one, act like one.

Don Quixote was considered a knight-errant, where he would wander the land in search for adventure in his pursuit for chivalry.

Acting as if…

How are you pursuing your adventure on becoming a better Salesforce professional, especially if your current position isn’t allowing for additional growth?

How about going out and speaking to some of those who are where you want to be some day.

Asking about how their days typically play out, the types of projects and challenges they deal with, and advice to offer you to get where they are.

Then, take some notes, think about these, and ask yourself:

“What would an Admin, Dev, Architect, Manager do in this situation when you come across them.”

Psychologically, having these thoughts and actions could help build your confidence as if you’ve already played the part in your mind.

Be creative, be that Salesforce-errant.  Just don’t fight any windmills.

“Thou hast seen nothing yet.” -Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote

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Previous Salesforce Career Seekers: Did you decide to quit?

In your initial pursuit of a career transition doing Salesforce work?

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Or even when you landed something and decided to eventually pivot out.

And more importantly, are you happy in whatever work that you’re now doing?

If so, I’d/We’d love to hear from you.

While I enjoy thinking and writing about Salesforce careers and will continue to do so, I think it’s equally important to discuss alternative paths to overall career success, enjoyment and fulfillment.

Particularly, when we seem to be consistently hit over the head with: Salesforce This, Trailhead That, Admin This, Certifications That, Community This, Opportunity That…the list goes on.

There are alternatives and I think perspective can help.

Maybe, I’ll come up with a short questionnaire to publish for those I hear from that decided that Salesforce wasn’t for them.

This post was inspired by a fitting quote I read today:

“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again…then give up. There’s no use being a damn fool about it.” ~W.C. Fields (American Comedian and Writer)

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“Why are you looking to make a change?”

“That’s none of your beeswacks, Chris.”

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I asked this question this week when speaking with a candidate who’s currently employed.

She delightfully answered and didn’t say the above.

Then I thought about it some more, and whether the question was really any of my business.

If it was being asked to me, I might question as why it really matters.

In this case, I wanted to make sure the position we’re discussing is not more of the same of what the individual DOESN’T want.

Often a job description only goes so deep, so we often need to dig a little deeper.

This then allows us to add those notes on the submission to either proceed or end the process.

Feel free to ask the recruiters you work with, “why do you ask?” if you feel uncomfortable with the questions being asked.

The question on current salary is probably one you’re thinking, which often company’s ask us to request, which we should also have an answer as to why.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: The right message at the right time.

“I already know dat, DADA!”

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I hear those words time and time again from my 5 year old.

But he doesn’t take action.

Then what happens?

Low and behold, someone else says something very similar and he’s all over it.

A different time, with a different demeanor, from a different person, under a different circumstance, causing a different reaction.

Often we hear or see something that we’ve come across before, and it doesn’t mean a thing to us.

Then our circumstances change, and it’s the one thing that we really needed to hear to keep us going.

Continue to keep your internal antennas up to catch those messages.

“For the 4th time, Son, go brush your teeth, it will prevent cavities…”

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Salesforce Professionals: Do you read?

I’m not referring to just Salesforce blogs or other online articles.

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Real, physical books.

Yes, they still exist, and believe it or not, they’re FREE at the library.

Or e-books if that’s your thing.

More importantly, reading books that seem totally unrelated to your current day to day work.

Maybe philosophy, auto-biographies, self-help, history, etc.

If you tend to struggle with some of the problems you face at work, maybe reading has the answer you need.

The possible path to overcome problems, might not be with you thinking and dwelling on them directly, but rather subconsciously through reading.

Go off course occasionally, see what comes to mind.

I know, if you only had time…

How about just 15 minutes before your day gets hectic, or on the bus/train ride in, or instead of watching TV in the evening.

Surprisingly, you may become increasingly better at solving problems on the job by relaxing a little outside of work with a book.

Thank you to, Brett Habing, for asking me to write a post about the significance of reading who I know has had success as a Salesforce Admin and BA by reading.

“If you don’t like to read, you haven’t found the right book.” – Joanne Rowling (Best selling author in history – of a book series)

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Learn from those who came before you.
Cartoonist Bob Mankoff’s, most reprinted cartoon in the New Yorker magazine history.

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Robert Mankoff, a former cartoonist for the New Yorker, had a strong desire to be employed by the New Yorker, but had quite the uphill battle to get that opportunity. The New Yorker receives thousands of cartoons a week, and their acceptance rate is close to 0, but he knew if he could make that team, he would be considered one of the best.

For 3 years and after more than two thousand rejections, he said in an interview that he received enough rejection slips to wallpaper his bathroom. 

As Bob was getting frustrated, he realized that the adage of “try, try again was not working”, so he decided to take a different approach. He went to the New York Public Library and looked up all the previous cartoons that had been published in the New Yorker since 1925.

He analyzed the cartoon captions for length and the type of humor that was presented to see if he could find some missing element that he wasn’t presenting that was, in essence, causing all the rejections. After not being able to easily understand that missing link, it hit him, as he then realized that all the cartoons had one thing in common: 

They made the reader think.

And the cartoonists used their own personal drawing style to achieve that. Furthermore, there was no single, “best” style, as many variations were picked over the years.

Finally, Bob revised his approach to be more in-line with what would be accepted causing the viewer to think about the drawing, as well as adopting his own dot style of drawing (called Stippling).

With his revised approach, he drew the below cartoon, which was the first to be accepted by the New Yorker.

The next year, he sold 13 cartoons to the New Yorker, then 25 the following year, then was asked to become a full-time cartoonist.

While we often hear the saying, “success leaves clues”, I think this story is a great example of that. Although, discovering what “worked” wasn’t easily recognizable, Bob took his own approach to figure out how to get better by studying the history of those who “made it”.

If you’re currently going down the Salesforce career path and not sure how to achieve the success that you’re desiring, take a look at those who came before you, talk to them, research their background, ask intelligent questions, look for similarities that you can latch onto. Sure, everyone’s journey may be slightly different, but I think you’ll find patterns that have led to their success which you can also take into consideration to help you in yours.

Article inspired by a chapter on Robert Mankoff from the book Grit by Angela Duckworth

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Salary Negotiations

Maybe there’s a middle…

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Or rather an intermediate in this context.

I was asked to conduct a mock interview yesterday as part of the Salesforce mentor-ship program.

One of the topics we discussed was salary negotiations.

I believe it’s always more art than science, as there’s many variables that come into play when it comes to salary and only you can determine what “works” for you.

But maybe there’s a middle…

If a potential employer makes an offer that is a little less than what you’re expecting and they’re not budging.

Rather than declining the position all together and assuming that you’re really interested, express that, and ask if there are any options to accelerate you receiving a raise within 3-6 months of proving yourself.

Some companies have the flexibility to do this and it can potentially keep the conversation moving forward.

Obviously, there has to be some trust that they’ll come through, but it would get your foot in the door and help you gain some additional experience.

Don’t end the conversation entirely, think about if there’s a middle.

“Oh baby, why don’t you just meet me in the middle? I’m losing my mind just a little” ~Zedd, Maren Morris & Grey – The Middle

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Salesforce Career Seekers: The Candidate/Employer Tension

I think we’ll continue to see this tension get tighter and tighter.

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You may be experiencing the same thing.

As more newly certified Salesforce career seekers come in to the job market, employers respond by adding another layer of qualifications.

And when barriers to entry to get into a new field are low (and relatively free), the ability to actually secure a position in said field gets harder and more challenging (although, not impossible).

If you’re venturing into a new career into Salesforce, I believe the more marketing that Salesforce does around job growth and the availability of additional jobs (how many are truly entry level?), the more tension employers will create to pull in the opposite direction causing the qualification bar to continue to rise.

Supply, demand, scarcity, abundance, wages, all of these weigh into the economic labor market equation.

I (and many others) will continue to think of ideas to encourage and help differentiate yourself from the masses with your creativity being the key differentiator, but please be aware of the candidate/employer tension that lies ahead.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Getting Help

In general, I believe your peers want to help you, especially if they see that you’re struggling.

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But, they need to “see” that you’re struggling and what you’ve done already, not just hear about your sob story about getting certs, badges and no interviews.

Over the weekend, I was working on my swimming and there is a guy in the pool who I often see.

He’s a good, experienced swimmer, I’m not.

After our swim session, he says, “hey, you should get some goggles, they’ll help you tremendously”.

We had never spoken before and it opened up some additional conversation.

I think this happened for a few reasons:

1. He’d seen me there at least 4-5 times before. (my consistency)

2. He was good at something, had been doing it for awhile, and wanted to help others/me. (his generosity)

3. He saw that I was putting a valid attempt in to get better (my effort).

If you’re not getting the additional help that you feel you need, think about if there’s other things that you can do to show others your consistency and effort.

It will often lead to the generosity of others.

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Nostalgia – the positive kind.

It’s interesting how nostalgia comes into play, especially in your career.

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The “good ole days” one may call it.

Often it’s a feeling of joy bringing back your career confidence of yesteryear.

Maybe, it’s you diving into code that you haven’t seen in years and remembering quickly how it all works.

Maybe, you’re a seasoned pro and starting out with a new company that reminded you of your 1st professional position after college.

Maybe, it’s you getting pulled into a new project where you’re finding similarities where you were able to perform your best work.

Maybe, it’s reuniting at a new company with past colleagues you previously worked with and were truly the A team.

Maybe, it’s having a lunch with a previous manager reflecting on how he/she has shaped you to what you are today.

Maybe, it’s passing that certification exam, and how it felt similar to handing in your last term paper in college.

Maybe, it’s you hopping on an introduction project conference call allowing you to reflect on previous experiences of starting something brand new again.

Allow the opportunities of nostalgia to sit in when they come, as I think they are a great motivator to keep you moving forward while remaining youthful and satisfied in your career.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: You control one thing.

Your effort.

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You don’t control:

if you get passed over.

if the recruiter ghosts you.

if the company cancels on you.

if someone on the team doesn’t care for you.

if you don’t get any feedback after an interview.

if the company drags their feed in making a decision.

if the offer is extremely lower than what you’re expecting.

Yes, all those things suck and shouldn’t happen, but they do.

Understanding that those annoyances you can’t control, and focusing on what you can control, is very important as you continue your journey.

Or maybe to put it another way, as the American rapper/producer/entrepreneur Sean John Combs/Puff Daddy/Puffy/P.Diddy/Diddy says:
“Can’t nobody take your pride, can’t nobody hold you down,
oh no, you got to keep on movin”

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Why This Path?

If you’re currently on or are thinking about pursuing a career as a Salesforce professional, why is that?

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Is it strictly for the tangibles (salary, prosperity, longevity, culture, etc.)?

Once you land something, will you be satisfied?

Or asked a different way:

At this moment, do you truly enjoy being overwhelmed with the setbacks, the studying, the denial of opportunities, the bruised ego?

With the realization that it’s all a part of the path forward?

If so, great, because here’s the thing:

The obstacles won’t stop, once you land a position.

You’ll continue:

to struggle to keep your head above water with information overload

to want to throw your laptop out the window when you can’t solve a problem

to be pushed (often by an annoying manager)

to deal with stakeholders and users with unrealistic expectations

to get denied that raise, that promotion, that project, etc.

A career in Salesforce (like any other career choice) is not all sunshine and rainbows (regardless of what Salesforce marketing shows).

The tangibles might be nice, but I don’t believe it will compensate for your personal job satisfaction over the long run.

Enjoy the path forward along with the twists, turns, potholes, and dead-ends that come with it.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Trailhead Badges – Collecting or Connecting

Which are you doing?

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Which do you think is more valuable?

Questions that you might want to ask yourself:

Am I gaining real knowledge or is this considered trivia?

Is what I’m learning applicable to landing my 1st position? Can I relate them directly to a job description?

Am I retaining or just doing?

Is it actionable immediately?

Can I apply what I just went over to do something more creative? Maybe connecting one to another to build my own complete solution.

Trailheads like Lego sets usually have a series of instructions and are a good foundation.

It’s when we take what’s given and build something unique, better and using our inner genius that allows us to stand out.

Yes, it’s hard; yes, it takes more time; yes, you might fail.

That’s why most don’t/won’t do it.

It’s not that most can’t.

More importantly: you’re not most.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: “You Don’t Have To Pay Me, Just Give Me Something Real”

These were the words of Bill Bilichick, coach of the New England Patriots NFL Team, when he was applying for his 1st football coaching position.

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I realize the Patriots are not in the Superbowl this year, but I thought his story is still inspiring since today is Superbowl Sunday for the U.S..

When Bill finished college, he mailed out 250 letters asking for some type of position as a coach.

No response.

Then, the Baltimore Colts needed a cheap film guy to study the games, provide notes, collect the playbooks from players who were cut, and to run
random errands.

The coaching staff determined during the interview that he had the passion to succeed and hired him.

Since 1979, he’s considered one of the greatest NFL coaches of all times, winning 8 Super Bowls as either a head coach with New England or a defensive coordinator with the New York Giants.

While I’m not saying working for free is the right choice for you, if you have only applied to 3 positions, or you’re not being creative in figuring out ways to
get your foot in the door, hopefully the above story will help.

Go San Francisco Chiefs!

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Your January

How did you do?

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Did you hit the new year running like you had planned back in December?

Maybe not.

Maybe you hit some unexpected obstacles.

Maybe you let some distractions tilt you off course.

Maybe you didn’t get the call back for the interview that you were hoping for.

Maybe you didn’t pass that certification exam that you prepared intensely for.

Maybe you went through 3 interviews and then didn’t get offered the position.

Maybe the offer that was presented just didn’t feel right, so you declined.

Maybe you started something new, and quickly realized it wasn’t for you (or the company decided that for you).

Maybe you got bruised, torn, cut or upset along the way.

Guess what you have the chance to do?

Begin your February!

How exciting! Another month to move forward.

Rip January off the calendar, it’s come and gone.

Reflect briefly, then get back at it.

You have the fantastic opportunity to go another round.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Restating The Obvious To Help You Standout

How about using the job description of the position you’re applying for to be the focus of your objective on your resume?

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For example (Salesforce Admin position I found from LI):

Responsibilities include:

-Interviewing stakeholders to understand needs and outlining solutions in Salesforce

-Creating and/or testing automation processes

-Manipulating data

-Working with the development team and assisting in their functionality testing

-Assisting in end-user training

-A background in innovation, problem-solving, data management

-Self-starter who is highly motivated and resourceful.

Suggestion for your objective:

“A highly motivated, resourceful and aspiring Salesforce Administrator with a background in innovation and problem solving with a strong emphasis on interviewing stakeholders to understand requirements, specific to Sales and Service clouds. Specialties include: workflow automation, data manipulation, end user training and testing, while working directly with the technical development team to help achieve greater success for XYZ company.”

Specifically, state the company to make it personal.

I think this approach is much better than: “Using my skills and experience to help a company achieve success.”

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Salesforce Career Seekers: The Blockbuster Model

About 20 years ago, Blockbuster offered a “try before you buy” approach.

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They allowed a customer to listen to a CD (yes, CD’s as in Compact Discs) before making a purchase.

It was a great model, as a customer could gain more clarity on what they were buying.

This model is applied to most services and products online now (streaming, shareware, etc.).

Sometime it’s just a sample, but enough to spark an interest.

Maybe this same approach can work for you.

By building out example Salesforce projects and solutions for potential employers to view and sample.

Providing a glimpse of what you can do, what you’ve learned, and how you’ve applied it.

It may lead to a phone call, an email inquiry, an interview and ultimately a job offer.

Companies often have resistance to making a hiring decision, so allow your work (not your resume alone) speak for itself and reduce their hiring reluctance.

You have a best-selling Top 40 hit to offer.

Potential employers need and want to listen, see, and experience it.

Create your hit!

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Salesforce Career Seekers: The Significance of Patterns

Patterns are used to solve problems.

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They help in reusability, maintainability, and performance.

Not just Apex, Integration or Error Handling.

How about the interview patterns you face?

Would you say most follow a series of patterns with the questions that are asked?

Functional, Situational, Technical, Personal, etc.

Continue to get comfortable with those.

Use those patterns to your advantage.

Occassionally, an exception is thrown, can you rely on a how you tackled a similar situation using the same type of pattern (technique)?

The significance of patterns…

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Your Work (no one else’s)

In the mornings, at the gym, there’s a guy who is in his lower 60’s and in pretty good shape.

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Every few weeks, I tend to see him with a different workout partner.

For only about a day or two.

Then he’s by himself, again.

This has happened at least 5 times over the last 6 months or so.

So I asked him, “What’s happening to all your workout partners?”

His answer: “I’m here, I’m putting in the work, if they show, they show, if they don’t, they don’t”

It doesn’t get much simpler than that.

Please don’t get so wrapped up in what others are doing, the success they may or may not be having, as the work that you’re doing is all that matters.

Keep it simple…

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Lack of communication often leads to bigger problems.

One of the biggest challenges, yet often easiest to correct, is communication break-downs.

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It’s usually not about the actual work, rather about how the situation was communicated (or rather not communicated).

Not communicating leads to surprises and management hates surprises.

If you’re interviewing and already have personal vacation scheduled, let them know.

If you’re behind schedule on a project, let them know (beforehand).

If you don’t understand how to do something (and have tried different options), let them know.

If you have a personal situation going on and are not your usual self, let them know.

If you’re going to be late coming in, let them know.

If the spend is approaching the budget, let them know (before it’s spent).

If you’re having a conflict with a co-worker and you don’t see it being resolved, let them know.

If a decision was made that really bothered you, let them know (I don’t mean whine).

Managers have intuition, most can get a pretty good read on people/situations.

Whatever message you need to give, they would much rather hear it from you.

It may cause you anxiety and some friction, but a majority of time, the problem can be resolved or minimized with effective and proactive communication.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Don’t stay in neutral

Neutral: Scrolling, reading and just liking content is not the gear you want to be on LinkedIn.

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You won’t go anywhere and may even start rolling backwards.

Start shifting those gears…

You never know who may be paying attention to what you’re saying, doing, contributing or engaging with/on.

Take your foot off the clutch and let the world and possible employers see that you’re moving forward.

Have no fear, an opportunity is near, just get your rear, in 1st gear.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Strengths or Weaknesses

One challenge I think we often have is, where do we focus our time and energy when it comes to our skills and inherent abilities.

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Do we work on identifying and improving our weaknesses or continue to zone in, refine and further build upon our existing strengths?

We see this being asked when it comes to what our next Salesforce certification should be or where should I go next in my career.

I don’t believe there is one perfect answer, but as long as we’re moving forward, rather than backward or staying stagnant in our current work, we’re headed in the right direction.

This thought conceived when I was doggy paddling in the gym pool yesterday attempting to swim when I’m traditionally a runner.

Keep moving forward, with or without swim floaties…

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Be Quick To The Point

Or rather, be the 1st to respond.

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To have a better shot at a new opportunity.

Recruiters often stick and move all day long.

Usually, the 1st qualified applicant that responds starts the conversation and possibly the submission process.

Sure, you might get ghosted, ignored, and whatever else, you can’t control that.

Control what you can control, which is your promptness.

Maybe some Vanilla Ice lyrics will help:

“Quick to the point to the point no faking

You’re cooking those recruiters like a pound of bacon”

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Salesforce Career Seekers: The “right” connections and conversations

Are you spending your time connecting and speaking with those that can get you a little closer to your 1st opportunity or are you reaching out to everyone and anyone that has Salesforce somewhere tied to their title/LI Profile?

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A few thoughts:

1. Many companies do not use external recruiters, those that do, are looking for those they cannot find themselves, typically that’s the needle in the haystack, you know the all in one: “Admineveloperarchitectbusinessanalysttrainertesteroperationalstrategist”

2. Companies that are looking to fill entry level positions will often use their own network, alumni programs and internal connections and referrals to find someone.

3. Salesforce recruiters are everywhere (or so it seems), most do the majority of their work in their respective geographical region where they have the closest relationships with companies. The odds that a recruiter located in Chicago will have a direct opportunity in Jackson, Mississippi where you live, is pretty slim (although they might have a colleague managing that region based on size).

While you never know where one conversation will lead, please make sure that you’re using your time and outreach approach effectively in your pursuit.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: You Can’t Walk Your Way Off The Island

Huh?

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This statement is an adage that is embraced in Latin America for up and coming baseball players who have dreams to make it to major league baseball.

Which means, they needed to swing hard and often…taking a base on balls isn’t enough.

As Roberto Clemente (Hall of Fame Hitter) once said (paraphrased): “Outside, inside, ankle high, at the head, it doesn’t matter, we’re swinging.”

I think this is the same approach you should have as you continue your Salesforce career search.

Take every conversation, every interview, every opportunity, every pitch, to swing your way into your 1st position.

100% on-site, help-desk, part-time, data cleansing, evenings, weekends, a lower than desired wage, lack of benefits, 1 hour commute by bus, train, walking, relocating, sweeping floors 70% of the time and Salesforce related work 30%

Any and every pitch that’s thrown your way.

If you’re not swinging at them all, someone else is…

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Inspiring and Motivational Quotes to Share

While some of us are internally motivated, I think many of us want or could use a little help to get us through the occasional troubling times that we’re currently facing or might experience in the future.

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Below are a list of quotes (some slightly improvised) from Jim Rohn, who’s considered America’s foremost business philosopher who wrote the book: “The Treasury Of Quotes”, where I chose the top ones that I felt might be the most helpful for you.

Movement/Activity/Labor:  🏃‍♀️🏃‍♂️

·      You must act, God said, “if you don’t move, I don’t move”.

·      The few who do are the envy of the many that watch.

Basics/Fundamentals: 🧮

·      Success is nothing more than a few simple disciplines practiced every day. Failure is simply a few errors in judgement repeated every day. 

Career/Marketplace: 💻

·      We get paid for bringing value to the marketplace. It takes time to bring value, we get paid for the value, not the time.

·      Where you are currently, is not where you have to stay.

·      The worst days of those who enjoy what they do are better than the best days of those who don’t.

·      You cannot change your destination overnight, but you can change your direction overnight.

Communication: 💬

·      Effective communication is 20% what you know and 80% in how you feel about what you know.

·      Communication is the ability to affect other people with words.

Desire/Motivation: 🙌

·      Motivation alone is not enough. If you have an idiot and you motivate them, now you have a motivated idiot.

Education/Learning: 📚

·      Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune.

Sharing Your Work:  ✌️

·      Nothing teaches character better than generosity

Goal Setting: 🥅

·      The value obtaining a goal makes out of you will always outweigh the goal itself.

Happiness: 😊

·      Learn how to be happy with what you have while you pursue all that you want.

·      Happiness is the art of learning how to get joy from your substance.

Health: 🧑‍⚕️

·      Make sure the outside of you is a good reflection of the inside of you.

·      Take good care of your body, it’s the only place you have to live.

Influence/Association:  🤼

·      You must constantly ask yourself: Who am I around? What are they doing to me? What have they got me saying? Where do they have me going? What do they have me thinking Most importantly: What do they have me becoming and is that okay?

·      Some people you can afford to spend a few minutes with, but not a few hours.

Journals: 📒

·      Don’t use your mind for a filing cabinet. Use your mind to work out problems and find answers; file away those good ideas in a journal.

Leadership/Management: 👑

·      Be strong, not rude; Be kind, but not weak; Be bold, but not a bully; Be thoughtful, but not lazy; Be humble, but not timid; Be proud, but not arrogant; Be humorous, but not insulting

·      Start with where people are before you try to take them where you want them to go.

·      Lead the way by personal example.

·      Managers help people to see themselves as they are. Leaders help people to see themselves better than they are.

Personal Development: 📖

·      How long should you try? Until.

·      What you become directly influences what you get.

·      The most important question to ask on the job is not: “What am I getting?”, rather “What am I becoming?”

·      It’s not what happens that determines the major part of your future. What happens, happens to us all. It is what you do about what happens that counts.

·      Your paycheck is your responsibility not your employers. Your employer has no control over your value, but you do.

·      You should do more than what you get paid for, as that’s where the fortune lives.

Problem Solving: ➕➗➖

·      To solve any problem, here are 3 questions to ask yourself: What could I try? What could I read? Who could I ask?

·      The best place to solve a problem is on paper.

Time Management: ⌛

·      Time is our most valuable asset, yet we tend to waste it, kill it, and spend it rather than invest it.

·      Don’t mistake movement for achievement. It’s easy to get faked out by being busy.

Hopefully, some of these made an impact for you as you continue down your Salesforce career journey.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Please check out this video!

By Stephen Church, Salesforce Administrator, as this is one of the best that I’ve seen.

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In ~11 minutes, it highlights:

* His approach to landing his 1st Salesforce position

* How he stood out with creativity

* His understanding and awareness that he did not have any hands-on experience and what to do about it by creating a custom application

* How he identified what most employers are looking for in an Admin and how to build a solution that included a data model, page layouts, security, automation and other features

* The use of diagrams, videos and screenshots (using simplicity)

* Identifying future enhancements to have an agile, continuous improvement mindset

* And many other valuable lessons

While this process is not the end all, be all, I strongly believe the work he put into this, helped him lead the field and land his 1st opportunity.

YOU can definitely do the same.

Thank you to Andy Davidson, MBA, for introducing me to Stephen and the excellent job Stephen did putting this together, along with the opportunity for me to share it with others.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/19JNi4I5KNYCKsM3XGryxeCmnAMYG9M3s/view

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Salesforce Career Seekers: A Few Lessons from Misters Rogers’ Neighborhood

In learning a little more about the symbolism that was provided to us in the children’s television series Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood that lasted over 30 seasons, 900 episodes, from 1968 to 2001 winning multiple Emmy’s, I believe there’s a few lessons that might apply to your Salesforce Career Journey.

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Blinking Yellow Stoplight = Slowing Down

In the beginning of every episode a stoplight is shown, blinking yellow.  As we deal with constant digital interruptions and always being on the “go” moving from one task to another, Mr. Rogers wanted to help enforce the need to slow down and take time to think for ourselves. Rather than always working on your next certification or that next Salesforce badge, slow down and think about creative ways to help you either advance your Salesforce career or to land your 1st Salesforce position. 

Maybe each morning, spending 10-15 minutes to write some creative ideas down to try, these ideas are unique to you. Rather than using specifically what a Trailhead or any other blog might suggest, trying using these as an initial guide but then come up with your own creative solution/approach.

Egg Timer = Focusing On The Task At Hand

In one episode, Mr. Rogers would cook an egg, timing it for 60 seconds in silence to show his audience how long 1 minute is, as well as how to be quiet and still during that time. This quiet time and focus helps prevent any outside distractions from interfering with what you’re currently working on. It could be an egg timer for 1 minute or a stopwatch for 30 minutes, it’s the ability to tune out emails, text messages or phone calls that will allow deeper focus on your current work.

Look For The Helpers = Mr. Rogers Would Turn To His Neighbors For Help

Whether it’s the postman, the policeman, the milkman or anyone else that was in his neighborhood, he would have them be a part of his show to teach his audience new things while carrying on an interesting and informative conversation about a specific topic.  In your Salesforce career search, are you turning to others to help you? While there’s plenty of information written already on various Salesforce topics, connecting with others and having a meaningful conversation to look for help and guidance can be a powerful process in your Salesforce career progression.

There’s many more lessons from this hit show, these were a few that seemed to have relevancy to your Salesforce career. Lastly, as he closed every episode, he told his audience:

“You’ve made this day a special day, by just you being you”.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Some Good Success Verbs for Your Resume (and a few other ideas)
  • Accelerated
  • Achieved
  • Contributed
  • Delivered
  • Eliminated
  • Exceeded
  • Grew
  • Improved
  • Maximized
  • Optimized
  • Produced
  • Sold
  • Streamlined

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  • Add a numerical accomplishment if you can. $, %, Time/Money Saved, Processes Eliminated, etc.
  • As you review your resume accomplishments, craft it to persuade an employer to hire you based on the benefits you have delivered. Even read them out loud saying: “You should hire me for this position because I…”
  • Your resume doesn’t just relay what you’ve already accomplished, but rather to help an employer envision what you can do in the future.

More context on this subject can be found here:
https://www.inc.com/peter-economy/the-ceo-of-ladders-reveals-surprising secret-of-crafting-a-winning-resume-that-will-get-you-your-next-job.html

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Why Write?

Over the last few years, I’ve become a strong advocate of writing and I encourage you to try it as well.

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I believe writing allows you to decompress, as well as the opportunity to help others.

To summarize a stoic philosophical conversation:

A philosopher was asked:

“What was the objective of all the trouble over a piece of craftsmanship when it would never reach more than a few people?”

The philosopher answered: “A few is enough for me, so is one, so is none. I am writing this not for the many, rather for myself, or for you alone, for each of us is an audience for the other”.

This year, you might want to incorporate writing into your daily or weekly routine or at least when something is troubling you, to see if it helps gets you over whatever hurdle you’re facing.

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Experiencing Cold, Gloomy Winters In Your Salesforce Career Search?

In the U.S., we just hit the official season of winter, and for many of us, that brings the colder weather, gloomier days, along with the potential for a little less motivation to do the things we want/need to do in our Salesforce career search journey.

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If we relate the winter months to your career search and maybe you’re hitting some cold, windy, icy, overcast days without much sun (new opportunities) in the forecast, causing you to feel a little down and unmotivated. Especially, when you’re not getting a call back after the interview or receiving any responses after submitting your resume for a position that seems to be the perfect match for you.

“If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome.” ~Anne Bradstreet (1st Puritan English Poet)

If this is the case for you and you’re hitting the winter season, remember that for the last 6000 years of recorded history, spring follows winter, which means brighter, warmer, sunnier days lie ahead.

“No winter lasts forever; no spring skips its turn.” ~Hal Borland (American Author, Journalist and Naturalist)

It’s during these winter months where our tolerance is tested and patience to persevere matters the most and this is the time to double down on your career search efforts when others may not “be in the mood” to do so, leaving you at a distinct advantage.

“Winter forms our character and brings out our best.” ~ Tom Allen (American Politician and Author)

If we decide to neglect today’s undesirable climate and corresponding gloomy mood for a better, more appealing tomorrow, once the warmer weather is finally here, we might not be as prepared as we should/could have been. Therefore, the act of planning, executing and having the confidence now, so when spring arrives, the possibilities of new career opportunities can be made available to you.

“Let us love winter, for it is the spring of genius.” ~Pietro Aretino (Italian Playwright, Poet, Author)

The Winter Season In Your Salesforce Career Search

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Salesforce Career Seekers: For 2020…

If you’re looking for an idea (or New Years Resolution) for 2020, how about:

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Allowing yourself to get slightly more uncomfortable with your career search.

Being uncomfortable means something different to each of us, but whatever you did for 2019, can you add another step to the process to see if better results can be obtained?

Some suggestions:

* Write that/those article(s) that you’ve been thinking about but haven’t executed on.

* Build and display those apps that will show your creative side.

* Reach out (leave voicemails) to hiring managers/internal recruiters after applying for a position.

* Follow up on a position until you hear the final decision.

* Ask a local Salesforce professional out for coffee or lunch to build a new relationship.

* Collaborate with others on your job search asking for engagement and opinions.

* Ask another Salesforce career seeker to team up on a project together to hold each other accountable.

* Find an opportunity where you can bring out your inner leadership capabilities.

The list goes on…

“Discomfort brings engagement and change. Discomfort means you’re doing something that others were unlikely to do…” ~Seth Godin (American author, blogger, marketer)

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Creating Momentum: Amelia Earhart Style

Salesforce Career Seekers – are you creating momentum and continuously moving forward as you work towards launching your Salesforce career?

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Or are you waiting for that perfect position to be thrown your way that allows you to work from home, make or exceed what the inflated salary surveys suggest, and jump right into a role that utilizes the certifications that you’ve spent hours and days studying to help show employers you have the necessary Salesforce skills to make an impact?

Maybe this story will help put things in perspective:

Amelia Earhart wanted to be a great aviator, but it was the 1920’s where women were often still considered frail, weak and women suffrage was just beginning, but she had one goal in mind: to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

She knew she couldn’t make a living as a pilot on day 1, so she took a job as a social worker.

Then one day she received a call… 

We have someone willing to fund the first female transatlantic flight, our first choice backed out, you won’t really be flying, rather just riding as two men will be flying and they will be getting paid and you will not. Oh, and you might die.

Guess what? She said “Yes!”.

After the flight she was interviewed and said:

“I was just baggage, like a sack of potatoes. Maybe, someday I’ll try it alone…”

Amelia knew she needed to get started somehow, someway, somewhere and she didn’t care if the conditions were perfect or ideal, she felt deep down that the momentum would continue and this trip was needed in order to move forward with her dream.

5 years later, she accomplished her goal and was the first woman to complete a nonstop transatlantic flight as a pilot, solo. 

As a Salesforce career seeker, are you taking every opportunity to move forward or are you waiting for a better situation to come along?

Could you be doing more to get some better traction in your journey?

Could you reach out and connect to more decision makers, could you go to more Salesforce networking events and consistently show up, could you build more apps to illustrate that you know how to figure things out by solving problems, are you thinking of creative ways to be a differentiator in the competitive Salesforce job market? 

Or are you just waiting for that 100% remote, Salesforce Admin Day 1 position, offering $80K with 4 weeks PTO and a company Tesla?

If you want momentum, it’s up to you to create it.

Those who attack challenges with the most energy, initiative and creativity, win.

Amelia understood this as well as many other successful high-achievers.

Keep moving forward.

“The most effective way to do it, is to do it.” ~Amelia Earhart

Amelia Earhart – Los Angeles – 1926

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Write It Down

You’re never going into an interview empty handed, right?! but are you also leaving the interview without anything new written down?

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Suggestion: before the interview, make a mental note to write a few keywords that are being asked/discussed during the interview, hopefully without interrupting the flow.

I believe this shows that you are engaged in the conversation, you stand out, as well as showing your studious side.

After the interview is over, reflect and expand on those keywords, while writing a few sentences about the topic, maybe what questions were asked and if you recall how you answered and how you felt while discussing them.

I think you’ll find a pattern in some of the questions that get asked, as well as some self-reflection, and it will also help you prepare for your next interview.

Bonus: write a post-interview summary article on LinkedIn to share with your connections to bring forth additional insights and conversations.

“Journaling helps you to become a better version of yourself” ~Asad Meah (Blogger of AwakenTheGreatnessWithin)

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Salesforce Career Seekers: What’s Your Story, Morning Glory?

Salesforce Career Seekers – as you continue your journey to land your Salesforce position, what’s your story?

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Do you have one? If so, is it compelling, not compelling to you, but to those that are interviewing you?

There are many Salesforce professionals looking to tell their story, but it’s not yours. Think about yours and how it might be relatable and appreciated, because it’s all yours.

Does it allow the Hiring Manager, HR, other personnel (whoever you’re speaking with) tell their boss that they want to move forward with you in the hiring process?

Is there any fear or tension created that if they don’t hire you, they might be missing out on something special?

Not with arrogance layered within it, rather with confidence that you’re the right individual to get the job done and make their lives easier based on your story telling.

What would you like them to tell their boss behind closed doors? That’s the message you want to convey, that’s the story you want to perfect and have them understand clearly.

Many times, that interaction, that story, that dialogue, is what they’ll remember, not so much just what’s on your resume, your certifications, badges, etc.

If telling your story didn’t come across as you thought, planned, or rehearsed. That’s OK, there will be more opportunities to tell it again. Fortunately, you can hear it and perfect it over and over to yourself.

Remember, your story is your unique story, it may not be appreciated by all, heck, it may not even be appreciated by many, but it will be appreciated by some (or a few, or just 1), and your goal in your Salesforce career journey is to find those that need you and your story to be a part of their organization.

Perfect, rehearse and refine your story…Morning Glory.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Did you miss the career fair at Dreamforce this year?

Don’t worry, be happy…

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Below is the Quip doc of all the employers that were there (over 60 of them) and what open roles they’re hiring for: https://lnkd.in/ekrk5BE

Over the holidays, you might want to review this list and make a connection (or follow) the hiring managers, other employees and internal recruiters to keep on eye on their LI postings for further engagement for the new year.

Tip: if you cannot determine who to connect to, review their profiles to see how active they already are on LI and focus your time on those individuals.

2020 is your year for a rewarding Salesforce career.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Your Post-Interview Follow-Up Cadence

If you’ve had an interview, how are you following up?

While I don’t believe there’s one approach that trumps them all, here’s 1 suggestion:

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1. Within 24 hours of the interview, thanking them for their time.

2. Within 1 week to ask if any decisions have been made and if there are any additional questions or misunderstandings you could address.

3. Within 2 weeks if #2 above was not addressed.

<If you did not get the position, there may still be some potential, don’t give up…>

4. After hearing they decided on another candidate, follow up within 2 weeks of hearing that message, as that candidate may have fell through.

5. If the position was confirmed to be filled, follow up 30-45 days after hearing that message as there are times when things didn’t work out as intended.

6. 90-120 days after #5, stay connected as there could have been other changes internally, another position opening up, etc.

7. Semi-annually to continue to build the relationship, regardless of what your current situation is (landed something else, etc.), you’ve made that connection, stay in touch.

With following up, the intent is to build, maintain, nurture and stay top of mind, while also differentiating yourself from others.

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Adverse Impact To Credential Inflation In The Salesforce Job Market

Credential inflation refers to the devaluation of educational or academic credentials over time and a corresponding decrease in the expected advantage given a degree holder in the job market. Credential inflation is thus similar to price inflation, and describes the declining value of earned certificates and degrees. ~Wikipedia

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While I’m far from an economist, this past week I learned more about credential inflation and the negative downstream impacts this might be having on the Salesforce job market. Credential inflation can lead to NOT what’s considered a candidate job market (where the candidate has the upper hand in being able to pick and choose what organization to work for) but rather the opposite where it’s leaning heavily in favor to an employer’s job market (allowing the employer to have the final say in how they want to recruit talent in), specifically when it comes to the inexperienced Salesforce talent pool.

When obtaining a Salesforce credential can be achieved from passing an exam causing a mass influx of certification holders, employers in return need to raise the entry gate for an applicant to be considered, with the hopes to reduce the number of applicants that apply. Therefore, resulting in most job descriptions requiring 2+ years of experience rather than entry-level. The cause and effect phenomenon.

Another potential indication of the devaluation of certifications is the gap (i.e. hardship) between what was needed for a newcomer 3+ years ago and the time and resources they had to spend searching, interviewing, etc. before landing a Salesforce position compared to those who are looking to get in now. Additionally, the “Accidental Admins” may not be as prevalent as they once were, as companies are able to find and hire experienced Salesforce Admins if desired, where as prior years the supply may not have been so readily available.

Of the millions of jobs that are expected to be made available with the Salesforce (cloud) economy, how many of those will ever be made available to the inexperienced talent pool raising the question: is the over-abundance in credentialing leading to a devaluation of said Salesforce certifications causing companies to take an adverse response?

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Digging Your Well (A Short Guide For College Grads Thinking About A Career In Salesforce)

Dig your well, before you’re thirsty…

No matter how smart you are, no matter how talented, you can’t do it alone.

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Recently, I had a soon to be college graduate, ask me about the best way to land a position as a Salesforce technologist before he finishes school. I thought this was a great question given he has 4 months of runway between now and the time he graduates, barring he does not get expelled for ordering a pizza in the middle of class between now and then.

The suggestion I had was an easy one to make: “start building your network of connections in the Salesforce ecosystem immediately”.

As the world changes, one thing will remain constant: the relationships you develop over a lifetime.

I think many of us wait until we are very close to graduating to make networking a priority, but to give yourself a competitive advantage against your other graduating classmates, start building the necessary bridges (aka connections) to help in forming meaningful relationships with those in the Salesforce community.

If you’re in an area that has Salesforce community meetups, please start attending and expressing your interest. I’ve been going to these for years, and very rarely do we have college students attend and I live in Houston where we have over 40 colleges and universities with over 300,000 students. You would stand out among your peers and have the opportunity to network with those already working in Salesforce. 

You can register for the various community groups here: https://success.salesforce.com/

Additionally, many universities have their own dedicated Salesforce Community Groups that are dedicated just to students. And if you don’t have one available, you could always start one.

If an in-person option is not possible, start showing up to the Salesforce virtual sessions such as the MVP Office Hours where the Salesforce community collaborates and aids those that are needing help and looking for real time feedback. Although, you might not be actively participating or don’t have questions, you should be listening and understanding the challenges existing Salesforce professionals are having, and then even start to build your network with those that are part of the group, by having conversations outside of this group setting.

Another great option is utilizing your alumni network. Search for alumni on LinkedIn that have a Salesforce title and connect with them to start conversations about their career, how they landed their 1st position and any suggestions that they might have if they were in your shoes. More importantly, KEEP IN TOUCH after making that initial outreach.  Most alumni are always open to helping a fellow student from their Alma Mater and if you’re genuine in asking for help and have humility in your conversations with them, I think most will oblige.

There’s a good acronym when it comes to networking and since we’re talking about school, what better way to tie this subject together:

R.I.S.K. 

Reciprocity – understanding that it’s a two-way street when building a network; you give, you get, you no give, you no get

Interdependency – our success does not come in isolation; we need to rely on each other for help

Sharing – hopefully we’ve all learned that sharing is caring; this is especially true in building your network

Keeping at it – sure, you may get the occasional brush off and that’s OK; if a door is closed, that just means another one somewhere else is waiting to be opened

The networking mistakes people make in their lives come from the risks they never take. 

Article was inspired by the book: Dig Your Well Before You’re Thirsty (The Only Networking Book You’ll Ever Need) By: Harvey Mackay, 1997

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SRTotD (Salesforce Random Thought Of The Day): How To Help The Inexperienced Salesforce Career Seekers

Would it make sense for Salesforce as a company to financially incentivize their customers to hire the inexperienced?

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In other words, Salesforce would offer a license discount (or premier support or some other SKU) to customers if the customer chose to hire an inexperienced Salesforce Professional who met specific requirements that Salesforce would stamp their name to (certifications, badges, mentorship program, graduating from an affiliated training class, etc.).

Would companies feel that the savings is worth considering this option?

I don’t have the math ironed out where it’s fair for everyone, but my gut tells me the imbalance of available positions requiring X years of experience and the candidate pool available that has that experience isn’t closing any time soon and I’m not sure if any compelling events are/have taken place to address this.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Please Don’t Get Caught With Your Pants Down

This scenario, unfortunately, happens quite often when I receive interview feedback. 

The career seeker decides to add a few technology buzzwords or responsibilities, that they weren’t directly a part of, to their resume. 

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During the interview, the interviewer decides to drill into those areas as part of their questioning.

There’s about a 90% chance the interviewer knows about those areas or wouldn’t be asking.

Uh, oh. Your pants start slipping, you’ve lost your buttons, your belt, and your suspenders. 

You might have one more shot, the interviewer changes direction and asks another question. 

Ka-plop, your pants are completely down and you’re embarrassed (or should be embarrassed). 

Interview over, credibility lost, and you need new pants.

Please make sure your resume is buttoned up to avoid getting caught with your pants down during your interview.

On behalf of Calvin Klein, Victoria’s Secret, and Salesforce interviewers across the globe, we thank you.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Bring Your Work…ADRIAN!!!

The importance of bringing your work to an interview.

In learning a little more about Sylvester Stallone’s story of how he was able to get his “lucky” break in show business, it reminded me of how you could apply the same approach in landing your first/next Salesforce position.

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Before Sylvester became a big-time name, he was actively going to casting calls to audition for parts, and during this time, he also decided to write the screen play for Rocky, which he states took 3 days to write after being inspired by a Muhammad Ali fight that he watched previously.

After writing the screenplay and as he was auditioning, he decided to tell the producers about his story, which sparked their interest.  They asked to see it and one thing led to another, the movie was made, Sylvester took the lead (after a long negotiation process), and the movie ended up being the highest grossing film of 1976, along with having 10 Oscar nominations (winning 3) and further producing a series of Rocky films grossing over $1 billion.

In the case of your Salesforce career, you’re actively auditioning/interviewing and speaking to your experience. In addition to this, you might want to also by like Sly and bring some examples of your work.

It doesn’t have to be in perfect condition, only about 10% of Sly’s original screenplay made it to production as most of it was trivial.

But it’s a start and shows that you’ve been able to produce tangible results and allows you to have a meaningful conversation that a hiring manager can connect to and ask questions about.

Occasionally, I hear, “Chris, I might not have internet access during the interview to show my Dev org”. Please don’t let that stop you as there’s plenty of ways to demonstrate your work through screen mock-ups, wireframes or a process flow using editing tools.  

Check out: https://www.justinmind.com/ or https://www.avonnicreator.com/

Another idea, if you wanted to show a real-time demo is to ask ahead of time if there is a guest internet login in the office or even using your cell phone’s personal hotspot.

I also understand the hiring manager or interviewing panel might not have time to see your work during your interview, so another option is to ask if it’s OK to send it to them before the interview or inquire if there will be time allotted to be able to do a demo or to review what you’ve previously sent.

The point in this exercise is:

To demonstrate your work which allows further conversations to be had and additional opportunities to arise.

The Rocky series may have never produced the global fame it has today, if Sylvester Stallone didn’t ask to show his screenplay.

ADRIAN!!!

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Salesforce Career Seekers: How Are You “Wow-ing” Your Interviewers?

I mean other than your stunning good looks, charming personality, pearly white smile, Old Spice/White Shoulders fragrance, and fly business suit.

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How about by bringing unexpected value to the table?

Things that make the interviewer(s) say, “wow, this candidate is really something”…in a positive way.

Differentiate yourself.

Here’s some ideas:

– Ask great, powerful questions.

– Share ideas and tips that allowed you to be successful that also might be useful for the interviewers current challenges.

– Communicate news, insights or recent events that are part of their industry.

– Show that you are the most prepared based on the research that you’ve done compared to any other candidate.

Maybe, just maybe, if your experience and skills aren’t exactly where they need to be, your “wow” factor can make up the difference.

So, before the interview, ask yourself: how can I bring unexpected value to the interview and show them my:

“WOW”!

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Are You Tapping Into Your Past Relationships To Help You Land Your 1st/Next Position?

With the almost hard to believe statistic that states approximately 80% of positions filled are through word of mouth, please take this into consideration during your job search.

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You might want to jot down 15 or 20 people you have either previously worked with, went to school with, been a part of an association with, or somehow have known each other through past interaction and check them out on LinkedIn.

Maybe, just maybe, they can get you one step closer to the front door depending on where they’re working, the type of work they’re doing and who they might be connected with that is tied to Salesforce. 

The best time to leverage your network during your job search was yesterday, the 2nd best time is TODAY.

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Salesforce Career Seekers: Suggestion, Transcribe Your Career Search Experiences

If you were to ask me 3 years ago about writing, I would have thought it was a complete waste of time.

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Now that I’ve been doing it for awhile, I find it very therapeutic due to the emotional roller coaster tied to recruiting and would suggest for you to give it a try as you go along your journey of landing your Salesforce position.

It doesn’t matter if you publish it on a blog or keep it to yourself, as you’re doing it for yourself. 

Below are some of the benefits:

– Equips us with overall communication and thinking skills

– Expresses who we are as an individual

– Allows us to explain and refine our ideas

– Allows us to analyze and understand a situation better

– Allows us to have some peace of mind moving it from thoughts to written form

– Provides lessons learned along the way to reflect on

Above all, it provides us comfort to wash away negative experiences and to start again. 

“I can shake off everything as I write; my sorrows disappear, my courage is reborn.” -Anne Frank (Author, The Diary of a Young Girl)

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Being Defeated Is OK (A Different Perspective For Aspiring Salesforce Career Seekers)

In speaking with aspiring Salesforce career seekers that have yet to get their break in landing their 1st PAID Salesforce position after months or even over a year of disappointment, I often think, maybe there’s a better path forward for them which has nothing to do with Salesforce.

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Daily, we are getting hit upside the head with the future of Salesforce opportunities, thousands of jobs to be had, the projected growth of the platform, the ease of training oneself on Trailhead, the vast support system that’s available, the big money to be made, the local and national events, the list goes on and on, BUT…

This career path may NOT be the right one for you.

Sure, obstacles, challenges and the ability to push through the anguish to land that 1st Salesforce position might be what you have your heart and mind set out to do, but maybe another way to think about it, is: 

A Salesforce career or something better than where I am today

With this mindset, it gives you the opportunity to explore other career options that exist that can also give you the sense of accomplishment and career satisfaction, and only you can decide what better might be by being open to hear, explore, think and try those options.

Better for you is FOR YOU, not what anyone else necessarily encourages you to do. Your own personal perspective weighs heavily into what “better” might be, and having context around what you enjoy, and excites and motivates you to move forward.

Therefore, if you feel extreme anxiety, or the burden upon you every day as you chase this Salesforce career path, re-evaluating your situation with a deeper perspective should be the next, best course of action.

Giving up is also a sign of maturity and internal wisdom to realize something is not working and a change needs to be made.

Additionally, we often don’t speak to or highlight the challenges that a Salesforce professional experiences as part of their day to day activities, but they should be accounted for.

Some examples:

1.      Additional stress of managing unrealistic expectations by company stakeholders

2.      Dealing with end users who really don’t care about using the platform

3.      Working with other members of the team that end up breaking what you’ve built

4.      Spending hours during your personal time on the weekends or evenings to meet specific deadlines

5.      Carrying dead weight of other members of the team that make you miserable working with

6.      Layoffs will/do happen even for a Salesforce professional

I think if you have a candid conversation with most Salesforce professionals, they will tell you that their Salesforce career has its associated challenges.

For some, Salesforce fell into their laps, for others, the challenge to break in wasn’t extremely difficult, for others it was, but in summary:

It’s OK if you determine that this path is not meant for you, it doesn’t have to be, as there are endless possibilities to finding a career that brings you joy, satisfaction and success, and it’s up to you to find it.

As you continue your pursuit, rather than having the mindset of: 

Salesforce only

Think about:

Salesforce or something better than where I am today

Hopefully you would agree, that’s what really matters in your career…

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Digging Your Well (A Short Guide For College Grads Thinking About A Career In Salesforce)

Dig your well, before you’re thirsty…

No matter how smart you are, no matter how talented, you can’t do it alone.

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Recently, I had a soon to be college graduate, ask me about the best way to land a position as a Salesforce technologist before he finishes school. I thought this was a great question given he has 4 months of runway between now and the time he graduates, barring he does not get expelled for ordering a pizza in the middle of class between now and then.

The suggestion I had was an easy one to make: “start building your network of connections in the Salesforce ecosystem immediately”.

As the world changes, one thing will remain constant: the relationships you develop over a lifetime.

I think many of us wait until we are very close to graduating to make networking a priority, but to give yourself a competitive advantage against your other graduating classmates, start building the necessary bridges (aka connections) to help in forming meaningful relationships with those in the Salesforce community.

If you’re in an area that has Salesforce community meetups, please start attending and expressing your interest. I’ve been going to these for years, and very rarely do we have college students attend and I live in Houston where we have over 40 colleges and universities with over 300,000 students. You would stand out among your peers and have the opportunity to network with those already working in Salesforce. 

You can register for the various community groups here: https://success.salesforce.com/

Additionally, many universities have their own dedicated Salesforce Community Groups that are dedicated just to students. And if you don’t have one available, you could always start one.

If an in-person option is not possible, start showing up to the Salesforce virtual sessions such as the MVP Office Hours where the Salesforce community collaborates and aids those that are needing help and looking for real time feedback. Although, you might not be actively participating or don’t have questions, you should be listening and understanding the challenges existing Salesforce professionals are having, and then even start to build your network with those that are part of the group, by having conversations outside of this group setting.

Another great option is utilizing your alumni network. Search for alumni on LinkedIn that have a Salesforce title and connect with them to start conversations about their career, how they landed their 1st position and any suggestions that they might have if they were in your shoes. More importantly, KEEP IN TOUCH after making that initial outreach.  Most alumni are always open to helping a fellow student from their Alma Mater and if you’re genuine in asking for help and have humility in your conversations with them, I think most will oblige.

There’s a good acronym when it comes to networking and since we’re talking about school, what better way to tie this subject together:

R.I.S.K. 

Reciprocity – understanding that it’s a two-way street when building a network; you give, you get, you no give, you no get

Interdependency – our success does not come in isolation; we need to rely on each other for help

Sharing – hopefully we’ve all learned that sharing is caring; this is especially true in building your network

Keeping at it – sure, you may get the occasional brush off and that’s OK; if a door is closed, that just means another one somewhere else is waiting to be opened

The networking mistakes people make in their lives come from the risks they never take. 

Article was inspired by the book: Dig Your Well Before You’re Thirsty (The Only Networking Book You’ll Ever Need) By: Harvey Mackay, 1997

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Salesforce Career Seekers – You Are An Artist

Salesforce Career Seekers – if you’re currently not seeing the results that you would like in landing your 1st Salesforce position, I encourage you to take on an artist mindset and start to work on your craft.

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You have all the tools you need to start (Trailhead, Developer Org, Support System, User Groups, Books, Blogs, YouTube Videos, the list goes on). The next step is to start using those tools and applying your individual thoughts to build on what you’ve learned.

Any employer can turn Salesforce “on” and start using the out of the box Salesforce functionality, but your goal is to build, customize and create a series of apps that are unique to you, your personality and the ideas that you come up with that a potential employer can have interest in and potentially start a conversation with you.

This process shows and proves that you can take an idea from a concept to a tangible, working product.

Someone (an employer for example) can always buy a stock photo that was produced for the masses, but if they want something truly unique, they’ll buy individual art.

Art has personality, it has emotion behind it, and it has the labor of love that was required to build it and then the opportunity for you to show the world, “I made this, it’s for you”. The “you” in this context is the employer who has a need for what you can do. Although, it won’t be every employer and if initially you do not get any interest, then you try again, and again and again, one paint stroke at a time.

You’ll learn, you’ll revise, you’ll get feedback and you’ll become better. 

Bob Ross, American Painter, Art Instructor and Television Host has painted over 30,000 paintings in his lifetime, and 91% of those contained the same elements (clouds, mountains, lakes). He then added his own personality to each and every painting based on how he was feeling that day. Translate this to Salesforce, it can be accounts, opportunities, cases, contacts, workflow automation, data validation rules, or even custom objects which you create. After reading or thinking about a concept, figure out ways to apply that to your work in progress application and keep building upon it.

A few quotes by Bob that might help you in your journey:

“The secret to doing anything is believing that you can do it. Anything that you believe you can do strong enough, you can do. Anything. As long as you believe.”

“I think there’s an artist hidden at the bottom of every single one of us.” 

“We don’t make mistakes. We just have happy accidents.”

“Anytime you learn, you gain.”

“Talent is a pursued interest. Anything that you’re willing to practice, you can do.”

Now it’s your turn to be an artist and show the world what you can do.

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Salesforce Newcomers: What Are You Doing To Become “Known”?

I strongly believe that is the #1 question to ask yourself daily.

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You should have a list of simple, realistic and easy to obtain goals to help you become more known.

Think about how a marketing drip campaign works.

Drip, drip, drip…

That’s the mindset you should have.

Building awareness, dropping value, making connections, meeting others, writing, engaging, showcasing your work.

Daily, weekly, monthly, whatever cadence you want; the more the better as long as it’s valuable and not:

Posting 1 certification and saying: “here I am, come and get it”.

My brother from another mother, Ben Duncombe, just hit me up and we’ll be working on a podcast around “branding”, but in the meantime, please start thinking through and listing some ideas and goals to help you achieve better awareness of who you are, what you can do, and why you have EARNED the right to be a contender in this ultra competitive Salesforce newcomer job market.

And if you’re hesitant, remember this:

“Be who you are and say/do what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.” ~Dr. Seuss

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Momentum

Salesforce career newcomers – as you know, landing your 1st Salesforce related position is always the hardest in your journey.

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But think about the word: momentum

Finding and applying to that 1st position, connecting to that 1st hiring manager, getting called in for that 1st interview, getting accepted to do some pro-bono work, having informative conversations with existing Salesforce professionals, passing your 1st cert, etc. 

Whatever little successes you’re seeing build upon each other, use that as positive momentum to keep going.

You might not always realize it, and some may be extremely small, but it is forward motion. 

A manual water pump doesn’t produce water on the 1st pump, a merry-go-round doesn’t spin itself without some manual up front pushing, and a locomotive takes force and energy to start going. 

Your career should be viewed the same way, as momentum builds on itself with time, effort and consistency.

Mo…Mome…Moment…Momentum!

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Two Things An Employer Is Evaluating

Salesforce Career Seekers – as you continue to put your sales hat on to help sell yourself into your 1st position, there are 2 major things that come to mind that an employer is most likely evaluating. 

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How do they:

Reduce the risk of the hiring decision. 

Trust that the individual selected is the right choice. 

And how do you go about meeting/exceeding these objectives?

It’s not just by what you say, but rather by what you can show.

There are countless ways to show and share your ideas, your work, your passion, your skills, your ability to connect and collaborate.

And this is all FREE!

It just takes time.

Doing so, builds awareness, allows connections, reduces risk and increases trust.

Help make the hiring manager’s decision an easy one.

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Interview Tips

This week, I was asked to conduct a mock interview for an up and coming Salesforce professional, as part of the Salesforce mentorship program.

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Some key takeaways from that interview that I thought might be helpful:

– Have an answer regarding why you chose Salesforce as your profession (suggestion: probably best to leave $ out of the answer).

– Be sure you’re in a quiet location for the call, even subtle background noises can be a distraction (wind blowing, traffic, cows mooing).

– If you’re unsure that you answered the question being asked, ask the interviewer: “did that address your question or should I elaborate further?”

– Have a good answer to: why you chose to apply for this position and/or this company.

– Have a few answers to: how you solved a challenging problem, why it was a challenge and what you learned.

– Follow up with a brief email (again: brief), reiterating what you heard and why you think you would be a good fit; be specific.

Short tribute and relevant lyrics:

“If at first you don’t succeed (first you don’t succeed),

Dust yourself off, and try again

You can dust it off and try again, try again” 

“Try Again” ~ Aaliyah, 08/25/2001

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The Value Of Asking – Example Provided

When you’re looking to make a career move, there’s a reason (or many) why you’re looking elsewhere. And you want to help make sure that you’re not going to run into the same predicament in your next opportunity.

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One idea is to ask for further understanding around those particular areas prior to the interview.

This not only allows you to determine if the company, role, work, road-map ahead, culture, etc. are a good fit for you, but it also shows the hiring manager that you’re intellectually curious and have a genuine interest to ensure you’re doing the proper due diligence which translates to being analytical, which is what employers are looking for.

Now some companies may not want to address those questions up front in writing, but rather during the interview itself, just make sure they get addressed.

Real world scenario that happened this week:

A Salesforce Sr. Admin was looking to make a career move and one of the primary reasons was that they were looking to solve more complex business problems.

What did they do:

Ask me to ask the hiring manager if they could review some written examples of the process flows of their current business operations.

The intent was not to try and “steal” any proprietary information, but rather to understand if it’s a good fit for them to improve their skills by being faced with more complex and interesting challenges.

This is not only for your benefit, but it also shows the hiring manager that you’re intellectually curious and puts you in a good light even before the interview.

The hiring manager didn’t feel comfortable providing this up front, but rather we expedited the interview process and we all went in together for an informal discussion of the business operations, the problems being faced, and the road-map ahead.

At the end of the discussion, the candidate had a lot of the input that they were looking for to help base their decision on.

Remember, you’ll never get what you don’t ask for, and there’s typically much more of a beneficial outcome when you decide to ask for what you want and need, to help ensure your next career move is right one. As long as you can put some reasons behind why you’re asking, most will oblige which will lead to a better outcome.

The value of asking…

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Salesforce Career Seekers (Specifically Aspiring Developers):

A conversation of “buts” that might be in your head:

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Aspiring SF Developer: Chris, I keep trying, but I can’t get a break.

Chris: Please be patient, your time will come, hers did.

Aspiring SF Developer: But, maybe I’m past my prime?

Chris: No, you’re not, it wasn’t past hers.

Aspiring SF Developer: But, I live in a small town.

Chris: Doesn’t matter, she did too.

Aspiring SF Developer: But, I’ve never had a job in tech.

Chris: Neither did she.

Aspiring SF Developer: But, I don’t have a 4 year computer science degree from a major university.

Chris: She had a 2 year programming degree at a local community college.

Aspiring SF Developer: But, I took some years out to be a mother.

Chris: Oh yea, how about 15 years that she took.

Aspiring SF Developer: But, I don’t know what to do now.

Chris: Neither did she, BUT, what she did have was goals and aspirations to become a Salesforce developer and now has been doing it professionally for 3+ years.

Post inspired by a phone conversation I had with a Salesforce developer this week where all the above was true.

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Salesforce Career Seekers – An Idea To Take Into Account When Interviewing

Treat it like an investigation with answering these types of questions:

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1. What are the problems with the company that you’re interviewing with trying to solve?

2. What are the anticipated outcomes of these problems and what is the timeframe to achieve those?

3. How would you approach solving these given your experience (or if not experienced, your approach to solving any problem in the past).  And I’m referring to a systematic, thought provoking process, not just “Googling” for an answer.

The more you can find out about #1 and #2 before the interview, the better. Then further flush these out during the interview. Then write a short follow up afterwards summarizing what you heard and your approach. 

Will it guarantee a new position? Of course not. 

Will it help you stand out and be remembered? Without a doubt.

Will it help you be better prepared for your next interview? 100%

In Summary: Investigate, Anticipate, Demonstrate, Correlate, Collaborate, Differentiate, Be Great!

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Please Don’t Do These

In the world of recruiting/contract staffing, the more ridiculousness I run into, the more I realize if I didn’t have a good relationship with the customers I work with, I would have been kicked to the curb long ago. 

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Here’s the latest, please don’t do these (for my sanity):

1. If you’re going to use the word “Present” on your resume, that means right now. Not yesterday, last week or last year. I don’t recommend to have “Present” on your resume and then your LI profile shows employment ending in 2018…you’re off to a bad start when dates don’t line up. 

2. If you’re running a side hustle other than between 7 PM and 7 AM or on the weekends or holidays, it takes about 2 days for your current project to figure it out and call me for an exit strategy. 

3. If you’re going to send in someone else for an in-person interview versus the individual I spoke with on the phone, at least give them the instructions I provided on how to get into the building, who to ask for, etc. – showing up like a lost puppy is not good; they failed the interview with flying colors, BTW.

And my wife wonders why I insist on having 3 glasses of wine at dinner…

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Understanding The Compensation

This is about as annoying as it gets, IMO. Employers, please don’t do this (this way), I see nothing but smoke and mirrors and a lot of potential ticked off candidates with a recruiter stuck in the middle.

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I received a job order yesterday (from a new employer) stating the salary was $120k. 

I then go back and asked about the bonus structure. 

Their response: actually the salary is 90% of the 120k, with a bonus structure of the other 10% after 12 months of employment. 

It’s funny how they left that critical part out of the initial job req.

In good faith, I’ll assume they were waiting for me to go back and ask as I wait patiently with popcorn and soda.

Be careful candidates, always understand the full compensation up front before proceeding. If the recruiter doesn’t know, it’s their job to find out.

It appears that Harry Houdini, David Copperfield, David Blaine, and Criss Angel have teamed up to help some employers write job orders.

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The Significant Imbalance Of The Salesforce Job Market

As I continue to read about the future of Salesforce job growth and the recent headlines on training more Americans to earn Salesforce credentials, I’m having difficulty understanding how this is going to work out.

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I’ll be the first to admit to drinking the Salesforce Kool-aid on the future economical impact that will be made long term, and I’ll continue to think of ways to encourage others to go after their Salesforce career aspirations, but would also like to analyze where we are and where we’re going.

Let’s recap some of the numbers:

  • According to the IDC*, Salesforce and its ecosystem or partners will generate 3.3. million new jobs by 2022
  • More than 300,000 job postings ask directly for Salesforce skills*
  • Salesforce pledges to give 500,000 Americans (or I think it’s now 1,000,000) the skills they need to earn Salesforce credentials and get top jobs in the Salesforce ecosystem**
  • 1.4 Million learners around the world are transforming their careers and lives through Trailhead**
  • Salesforce offers training and re-skilling opportunities through programs like: Futureforce, Vetforce, Pathfinder**

In all these headlines, where are ENTRY-LEVEL positions being discussed?

Entry-level are the majority of the types of applicants that are enrolling in these programs that have no prior CRM, Database, Programming or Business Analyst backgrounds (Veterans, Career Changers, Under-employed, Non-IT College Graduates, etc.).

In doing some additional research:

  • On the Salesforce website (https://salesforce.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/External_Career_Site) they have 1954 open positions, 18 show internships, about 22 came up with my search of entry level (of those 22, many didn’t really seem like tech positions).
  • On the Vetforce website (https://veterans.force.com/VetforceEmployerPartners) they have a list of employer partners, so I took a sample set:

Searched by “Entry Level and Salesforce”

  • Accenture: 149 total, 6 entry level
  • Dell: 188 total, 42 entry level (all Sales related, not Admins or Devs)
  • Deloitte: 122 total , 3 jobs titled Intern or Student
  • PWC: 9 total, 0 entry level
  • Simplus: 4 total, they have a Bootcamper program in Salt Lake City, not sure how many can enroll or if it guarantees a job afterwards
  • Slalom: 125 total, all look to be at least 2 years experience needed

I then searched some of the biggest company’s on the Fortune 500:

  • Walmart: 12 total, 0 entry level
  • Exxon: 0 total
  • Apple: 7, 0 entry level
  • Amazon: 451, most seem experienced only
  • Facebook: 37, 0 seem to be entry level

Switching directions to a generic search on LinkedIn for Salesforce jobs, it’s hard to get a read on the number, as most employers are classifying their positions as entry level, but all the random sampling I did shows at least 2 years prior experience.

Let’s just say there are 50-100 entry level Salesforce positions floating around somewhere and I’m not looking in the right places or my sample set is completely off the mark, my understanding there are many more coming out of these training programs (or taking their own direction to switch careers) to find Salesforce work,

Where are they all expected to go?

Something seems out of balance, or maybe I just need to work on my journalism skills.

References:

* IDC White Paper sponsored by Salesforce, written October 2017

** Investor.Salesforce.com Press Release, May 16, 2019

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Salesforce Career Seekers – Showcase!

In the highly competitive Salesforce job market, where most applicants have Trailhead badges, a few certifications, maybe some volunteer experience and a well put together resume, there needs to be additional areas that are unique to your capabilities showing how you think, solve problems and add value to an organization.

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I believe the #1 way to be able to do this is: Showcasing.

Showcase: 

Verb: The ability to exhibit or display skills

Noun: A place for presenting something favorably to gain attention

The key words in the above definitions: Skills & Attention

Every day we’re inundated with others trying to grab our attention, but as a job seeker you need to consistently be at the top of the attention list to your network and to potential employers by showing, demonstrating and proving your skills and added value.

I realize there may be some resistance to putting yourself “out there” and you might get criticized either for doing something incorrectly or potentially showing a lack of creativity. Fortunately, most are not going to analyze your work to that level of detail, but rather identify it as a key differentiator between you and another potential candidate. The feedback and attention on your work that you might receive whether constructive or positive, builds on itself and allows you to become better known as a contributor in the Salesforce industry.

Plus, it shows the world you have passion in pursuit of your career aspirations.

When all things are equal, YOU, YOUR PASSION AND YOUR CREATIVE WORK make up the difference.

Creativity is scarce, scarcity creates value, value is what employers want, need, and are searching for.

But Chris, I don’t know what to actually “Showcase”. 

Have you thought about it, have you tried ANYTHING or are you resisting before even getting started?

We ALL have resistance and a level of vulnerability that we don’t really want to expose. It’s not near as bad as it seems, but the 1st step is to decide to try, try again, then try again. You will get better over time.

Persistence is key.

You can’t attempt 1 creative act and then stop, as that will not allow you to gain the attention that you’re looking for. Attention leads to conversations, which then leads to interviews that then leads to opportunities that then leads to a fulfilling career. This may take weeks, months or even a year to gain, but when you get started, I’m confident new ideas will start coming to mind. Some will be good and some will be bad, and that’s OK, as you’ll gain:

MOMENTUM!

You’ll learn more about yourself along the way, building your professional character and confidence. 

Below is a list of suggestions.

These are free or cost very little and you have most of the tools already at your disposal.

Everyone has their own medium they feel the most comfortable in, it could be videos, a podcast, a series of articles, blogs, posts, etc. You may want to try different ways as one may work better than another depending on the message you’re wishing to convey and the interaction you’re receiving.

All these mediums already exist and have been done by others, and you can easily piggyback back off what you enjoy and add your unique personality to them.

  • Create a blog/vlog or a custom Salesforce job tracker app around your career search journey, tracking the companies, the contacts, the job postings, how you applied, your follow up activities, interviews that were lined up, how you prepped for those interviews, and the associated outcomes.
  • Read, analyze, build proof of concepts, and provide your opinion on the quarterly Salesforce release notes that you liked/disliked.
  • Review the Salesforce Community pages where questions are asked and identify common issues that people are experiencing and use those to build a possible solution around.
  • Create an app that solutions a current problem you’re having at your office, your home, etc.
  • Attend some of the local Salesforce User Groups that often present specific functionality, then build off of those concepts.
  • Review products on the AppExchange that are not too complex and come up with a modified version of your own.
  • Check out various podcasts that members of the Salesforce community air as often they discuss problems either they’re working on or questions of listeners.
  • Review blogs of other content creators and create a spin-off of a problem they’re solving.
  • Some great specific Salesforce technical examples (courtesy of Chris Pearson, Salesforce Director of HFF in Houston):

a. Creating a trigger that automatically allows a file to be deleted based on a user action

b. Create a lightning component that allows a user to search and view all records they are following in Chatter

c. Provide an app that can take activities tied to an opportunity and present them in a data table

In spending a little time each day or week chipping away at showcasing your ideas and creativity to the Salesforce community, you’ll gain the attention and the career breaks that you’re looking for.

Feel free to contact me if you’d like to go through these or other ideas to help in your journey.

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The Salesforce Career Transition Dip

Evaluating changing your career to Salesforce? Please think about the career dip that’s involved to help make sure you’re making the right decision.

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What do I mean by “career dip”?

Basically, the drop that is most likely going to occur between where you are today in your career and where you’re wishing to go, which will not be a linear transition.

The dip would include a potential drop in: your salary, your experience, your industry reputation, your connections, your learning curve, your attitude, possibly your well-being, etc.

Asking yourself if you’re willing to jeopardize these.

With all the Salesforce marketing that surrounds us everyday such as:

  • Salesforce company growth projections
  • Salary surveys of everyone and anyone making 6 figures in a Salesforce career
  • The Salesforce community continuously posting about meet-ups, events, conferences, success stories, camaraderie, etc.,
  • The ease of self-educating and re-tooling yourself with Trailheads and Certifications
  • The vast amount of demand for skilled Salesforce professionals in the marketplace
  • The ability to easily get in and volunteer at all the non-profits to get experience

While all this is great to see, there also needs to be some realism at hand by first understanding where you are today, and thinking if taking the plunge over to Salesforce is the right choice for you, your family, and your personal financial situation, along with the downside effects that are going to happen first as you bottom out into the dip.

Weekly, I speak to those that have been in a non-Salesforce related position for 5, 10, 15+ years and are ready to make the transition. Then as we dig deeper, we discuss their current situation and everything their career has built up to over the years with the comfort, steady income, and knowing exactly how to do perform well at their current position.

Although they feel they have hit a dead end in their career growth and that it’s time to do something new and exciting, inevitably Salesforce seems like the easiest path with the least amount of resistance based on the above reasons. 

In my opinion, that is just not the case.

Why?

Getting in on the ground floor in the Salesforce ecosystem is HARD!

Either you’ve already been challenged with this personally, or you’ve heard about it from others or the negative thoughts might have started to run through your mind.

Like any other profession, almost (I’d say 95%) of employers want REAL experience. Most don’t care if:

  • You’re making $90+K at your last non Salesforce related position
  • You have 100K+ Trailhead points
  • 45 badges and counting
  • X times certified
  • Went through world renowned training boot-camps
  • A participant in local community events, Dreamforce, etc.

Why?

Those avenues are available to everyone with little to no cost associated and therefore doesn’t really set you apart.

I realize there was some sacrifice, time and energy commitment in achieving some of the qualifiers that Salesforce has to offer, but frankly that is just NOT enough.

So here’s where the dip comes into play and how to get through it… 

Those that are willing to push through by experiencing the failures, the no’s, the “come back when you have more experience” excuse, the salary reduction of 20, 30, 50%, the months of potential volunteer work you put in,

But more importantly:

YOUR ABILITY TO DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT ALONG THE WAY.

Key word being “different”.

How can you be different?

One suggestion is to showcase what you can do without seeing a dime from it by coming up with your own projects, problems and solutions and showing the world what you can offer as it’s unique to only: 

YOU!

And doing it continuously.

This is where the real opportunity can be found.

Your work, your craft, your ability to constantly be uncomfortable by challenging yourself and prove to others your self worth.

Saying: this is me, this is what I can do, this is the value I can add to your organization. I am the right fit because of what I’ve done, while explaining in intimate detail why this matters with conviction and a positive attitude.

But before you begin this journey, are you ok with the career dip that will inevitably exist, by being better than where you currently stand, by differentiating yourself, as this is what it’s going to take to be successful.

You can say no, as this Salesforce career transition path is not the only one that’s available to your unique personality, skills, background and service offering and greater success does exist elsewhere. 

Besides, you’ve already been pretty darn successful to get to this stage of your career and you have the battle scars to prove it.

You’re on your own personal journey to find career greatness, just don’t let the external Salesforce “hype” influence your decisions while removing realistic expectations of what’s involved in the process to get there.

Better things await you, but a career dip is inevitably at play.

I’d welcome the opportunity to speak with you further in evaluating your career options.

Article concept inspired by Seth Godin’s book: The Dip

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The CRM Recruiter’s Top 10.5 Takeaways From: Beyond CRM Basics: An MVP Guide To Expand Your Knowledge And Grow Your Career By: Deepa Patel

Deepa Patel’s book: Beyond CRM Basics, provides a great look into what a CRM project entails, and emphasizes the primary role of a CRM Business Analyst. Whether you’re a newcomer to a CRM project or a multi-year experienced professional, every chapter has insightful tips regarding how a CRM implementation can be completed successfully and what your role as a Business Analyst plays in each step along the way.

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Additionally, the inspirational success stories provides a reader great examples of how others have taken their CRM career from knowing very little about CRM to a high-level professional career using Salesforce as the primary application.

I recommend reading the book in its entirety to get the full breadth of understanding and value. Below are my top 10.5 key takeaways to get you started:

1.      Discusses the most essential functions of a BA such as determining how requests impact the entire business, and why the request should be done, not just the how.

2.      Highlights the importance of documenting the business process up front, along with the tools to make this process effective.

3.      Provides a summary of all the various phases of a typical CRM project lifecycle along with all the parties that are involved.

4.      Emphasizes the most important skill of a BA such as listening and being committed to having an open dialogue with the business by asking open ended questions while challenging assumptions.

5.      Articulates the core philosophies of an CRM implementation life cycle:

Emphasize the ‘keep it simple’ principle

Do not try to replicate the existing system, rather investigate revamping and enhancing the current processes

Have the BA define the test scenarios as the users may not know enough about the application yet

Place adequate emphasis on user training (pilot program recommended)

6.      Recaps that project failures are often due to improper business analysis in the following ways:

Incomplete requirements gathering

Lack of strategic alignment

Poor solution design

Missing features/functionality

Gap in meeting business needs leading to lack of user adoption

Poor change management and governance

7.      Demonstrates that project success metrics can be measured with some of the below examples:

User Reports: Logins, record creations

Data Quality Reports: Incomplete records, stale leads

Business Performance Reports: Opportunities with No Activity, Cases with past SLA’s, Lead Conversions, Pipeline by Owner

8.      Discusses how to better market your skills using some of the below methods:

Be specific as possible, employers do not want a generalist

Key words to use: Responsible for, led, accomplished, expertise in, hands-on

What is the ROI you provided: Money saved, users served, time reduced

Social will continue to differentiate you: LinkedIn, Twitter, blogging, sharing, liking

9.       Shows key ways to progress your career by using others success stories, for example:

Recommended for everyone to try consulting in their careers

Getting involved with local Salesforce communities, if there is not one near you, start one

Look for opportunities in demanding situations by highlighting Salesforce’s capabilities

Answer questions that are posted on the Salesforce community page to help increase your skill-set

10.    Summarizes the career progression of multiple Salesforce professionals providing examples of how they all started their Salesforce journey.

10.5. Provides great references to additional material to help you continue to learn more about how CRM projects are correctly implemented along with the capabilities Salesforce offers.

This book can be purchased on Amazon.

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Breaking Into Your CRM Career

As a former technical consultant turned recruiter, I occasionally get asked about how to get your first opportunity to work in a specific technology, when you have no prior experience.

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It’s always the catch-22, I can’t get experience if I don’t have it first, which I don’t believe is true if you apply some of the concepts below. Sure, it doesn’t happen over-night, but any remarkable success never does.

With the CRM market continuing to be red-hot and my primary focus in recruiting, this is the specific technology I get asked about the most, but I think these concepts can be applied to any technology or career choice.

1. Acres of Diamonds. In Russell Conwell’s book he discusses a farmer who hears about other farmers making millions discovering diamond mines, so he decides to sell his farm and go searching. In doing so, he ends up being unsuccessful but coincidentally the new farmer who bought his farm discovers the land that he just sold is the most productive diamond mine on the entire continent. Moral of the story: if the first farmer had taken the time to analyze and study his current surroundings before looking elsewhere, his desires to own a diamond mine would have come true.

How do we translate this story to the career step you’re looking to make? Regardless of where you work, who you know or what you do, I believe either your current employer or someone in your network has a direct connection to a technology you’re looking to get into. They could be an end user, an administrator, a consultant, or even work for a product company. Specific to CRM, most companies have a CRM system of some type, whether it’s a notepad, sticky-notes, Rolodex, phone or a more sophisticated technology. I suggest talk to your sales team or someone within your network sales team to find out how they’re using it to track their leads, accounts, opportunities, sales process, etc. Then, move into I.T. to find out who manages the CRM, what it is, how they do it, what’s the status, etc. and continuously spend time with them asking questions.

As you continue to gather information, ask if there’s an opportunity to tackle some of the easier requirements, enhancements or defects the I.T. team is currently working on. This may have to be outside of your current day to day responsibilities, but obviously some additional effort will be necessary to accomplish your new career path. Generally, I.T. has more work than resources, so getting some additional help would generally be greeted with open arms. But, you need to minimize the additional overhead for them, so they key is to learn, challenge yourself and look for solutions on your own. Create a demo environment (sandbox) and work on a few of the requirements they have, see what you can come up with and then present your ideas back to gather feedback, make changes, self-educate and over time, new opportunities will come your way as you get more proficient in your skill set.

2. Experience Needed – Will Work for Free. As ridiculous as this might sound, taking this leap of faith will lead to long term success. A notable example: Carlos Siqueira, who’s a Salesforce MVP now, just posted a 2-year anniversary about how he was able to break into the Salesforce technology by doing a 6-month Salesforce administrator internship (for free!). Sure, he hit some obstacles a long the way, but as he looks back on the sacrifices he made to get where he is today, he would do it all over again without hesitation. If Carlos can make this step, anyone can. But, the point is making the 1st step. Be vulnerable, be prepared to get rejected, to struggle, to be challenged, but keep moving forward and keep asking to help others and for others to help you. Working for free is never the ideal situation but gaining the experience and the ability to add actual hands on experience on your resume is guaranteed to give you more opportunities for the future. Unfortunately, certifications alone show that you’re committed to learning the technology, but the professional experience is what employers will always look for.

3. Put the “Work” into Network. Everyone who’s currently doing what you want to do has a story about how they got there. Sure, it’s their story and may not completely apply to you, but for each story you hear, there’s a potential for you to learn from their experiences to determine how to use that for your current situation. I don’t mean speaking to 1 or 2 people and stopping to say their experience was so unique and could never work out for me, as that might be the case. Rather talk to at least 20 people, whether that’s in a User Group meeting, via LinkedIn or at a technology conference. I’m confident that you will pick up small experiences from others that can be very relatable to where you are today. The contacts you meet who are willing to help will be a great sounding board for you as you continue to evolve into the career you desire. The key is continuous contact, share information, gather feedback and one of those contacts may even be who will lead you into your next terrific opportunity.

Feel free to connect with me for a more detailed discussion or to hear about my specific story or if I can help you connect with others to hear about theirs.

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Salesforce Technical Recruiting Market – Unqualified Applicants

As the demand for the Salesforce technical developer skillset continues, so does the number of nuances in the recruiting business that’s associated with it. If you’re new to the situation, I wanted to share some ideas of what I’m challenged with. (Note: this primarily applies to contract H1-B positions).

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Problem #2 – Unqualified Applicants (Please see my other article Problem #1 – Resume Factories)

After spending countless hours filtering through the volumes of Salesforce Developer resumes to find a candidate that I believe has the technical skill set, the interview process gets interesting. The process I take for a Salesforce Developer is much different than screening for any other type of position primarily because the time it takes to find and adequately screen a qualified applicant. 

Some may question this approach or find it can be intimidating as a candidate, and I try to do it in a professional and friendly way, but since the market is such a mess, I need to be as effective as possible during the process.

I find it’s best practice to not spend a lot of time asking about the candidates Salesforce career progression but rather just spending a few minutes asking about the last project they worked on and then diving deeper into a few of the bullet points that they have outlined which helped them stand out from other candidates (see my previous post on “Resume Factories” for those examples). 

If the applicant can speak to those specific technical development tasks in detail, then the next step is to start asking scenario based technical solutions (if I had a requirement of X, how would I solve it) or examples of when one solution would be used versus another and why (configuration versus customization). From that point, I jump into some of the technical text book Q&A around areas of customization, key development concepts, best practices, error handling, etc.

Usually within the 1st 5 to 10 minutes, I’ll understand if the developer has the experience they state they have, but when the conversation goes completely off the rails which it often does, I ask myself:

How did this candidate work at the companies they stated in their resume? Most are Global 1000 companies and I imagine the company’s internal technical team went through the same (most likely more) technical screening process as I did. 

1.      Maybe, the candidate worked where they said they worked, but their role was completely different than what their resume stated (Admin versus Developer, for example).

One way to help alleviate this is asking for references of past employers which then I’ve seen leads to receiving fake names, other consultants they worked beside and not direct managers, or Gmail email addresses of someone portraying to be their manager. Ugh!

2.      Since Salesforce has many technical concepts, a candidate often tries to answer a question in a vague and indirect way to a recruiter while touching on some of the Salesforce terminology and buzzwords with the hopes that it’s enough to get the candidate into the next round. We often call this approach of rambling “cooking the answers”.

“Google is your friend” and as crazy as this sounds, I’ve run into situations where the candidate either puts me on mute (or sometimes doesn’t) and will Google the answers during the interview process in real time. (Laughing to myself as I write this due to the how asinine this is.)

The reality of the market has made it clear to me that this process is strictly a numbers game from an applicant/sourcing point of view. X number of applicants equals Y number of 1st round interviews which equals Z number of 2nd round interviews and so on. Since so much time and energy is spent on the qualification side, I’m not sure how internal HR/Talent Acquisition departments and other external recruiting agencies are navigating through the masses.   

Recommendation for candidates:

Most is obvious. Do not do any of the above. If you don’t know an answer to a question, it’s best to say you’re not sure or to ask for more clarity. I don’t expect a candidate to know the answer to every technical concept discussed during the interview, but when the answer provided is a guess or “cooked”, your validity of an applicant quickly goes downhill. 

When references are requested, please provide accurate information, as I do call and/or email these.

Please reach out to me if you would like further guidance.

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Salesforce Technical Recruiting Market – Resume Factories

As the demand for the Salesforce technical developer skill set continues, so does the amount of nuances in the recruiting business that’s associated with it. If you’re new to the situation, over the next few weeks, I wanted to share some ideas of what’s happening.

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Problem #1 – Resume Factories

As a recruiter, much of the day is spent filtering through resumes that look very similar with the hopes to find a candidate who has the specific technical skill set needed and is worth the time to speak with and qualify. 

1.      It seems that 9 out of 10 resumes I review are close to cookie cutter as possible. The same experience, the same technologies, the same keywords, other than client names and project dates, almost everything else is identical. I’ve seen situations where the only difference between one resume and the next is the candidate’s name.

I’m not sure whatever happened to highlighting specific experience tied to a project’s environment and implementation.   

2.      How about a concise resume, 2 to 3 pages? Not in this market, I think we’re seeing an average of at least 8 pages, with the very similar role and responsibilities stated on each project. I realize the role of a developer from project to project will have some overlap, but doing the same exact set of tasks with no specific client requirements stated throws up red flags on the legitimacy of the work performed.

Common Examples for Salesforce Developer Resumes:

·        Over X years of IT experience, Y in Salesforce

·        Experience in Apex Classes, Triggers, Controllers, VisualForce

·        Worked on various salesforce.com standard objects including Accounts, Contacts, Cases, Opportunities, Products, Opportunity Line Items, Leads, Campaigns, Reports and Dashboards

·        Implemented various advanced fields like Picklist Fields, Master-Detail Fields, Custom Formula Fields, and defined Field Dependencies for custom picklist fields

·        Responsible for writing SOQL & SOSL queries with consideration to Governor Limits for data manipulation needs of the application using platform database objects

Common Examples for Lightning Developer Resumes:

·        Created multiple Lightning Components, added CSS and Design Parameters from LDS (Lightning Design System) that makes the Lightning component look and feel better

·        Built customized Lightning components replacing the existing ones; using JavaScript on the client side and Apex on the server side

·        Hands on experience in converting existing visual force pages to Lightening user interface look and feel to access it with the Lightning Component Framework

Recommendation:

Curtail your resume to add as many specifics as possible regarding what your exact role consisted of on each project, what specific modules within each technology you worked with, what challenges you overcame while highlighting the outcomes of the technical solutions you produced. If your resume looks the same as all your peers, there’s a high likelihood that you are often getting looked over.

If you would like additional guidance, please contact me and we can discuss further.

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